Viridian L-Theanine with Lemon Balm Maximize

Viridian L-Theanine with Lemon Balm

Stress can cause people to feel strung out, restless, anxious, tense, nervous and irritable as well as lose concentration and suffer brain fog. A number of studies have shown that the natural ingredients L-theanine and Lemon balm can help safely and quickly ease the symptoms of stress and improve mental performance and wellbeing.

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30 Caps
90 Caps

R 324.06

VEGAN


L-Theanine and Lemon Balm Veg Caps


INGREDIENTS: one vegetarian capsule provides:

Lemon balm extract (Melissa officinalis)                            300mg

L-Theanine                                                                             200mg

 

Disclaimer: All information contained on this website is for information only and should not be used to diagnose, prevent, treat or cure any disease, health or medical condition. The products (food supplements) are not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat or cure any health or medical condition. Do not exceed stated dose or use with prescribed medication unless advised by a doctor or medical practitioner. Do not take if pregnant or lactating. Keep out of reach of children. Consult doctor for all medical advice.


L-THEANINE WITH LEMON BALM

L-Theanine is an amino acid that occurs naturally in green tea (Camellia sinensis)1 and has been shown to possess anti-stress,2 anti-depressant,3 neuroprotective,4 and cognitive performance enhancing 5 properties. Like a nice relaxing cup of tea, theanine works very fast. L-theanine is a free form of the amino acid which is rapidly absorbed and reaches maximum concentration within 30 minutes to 2 hours.6 In fact, the first study to assess the effects of theanine found that a single dose of 200 mg quickly increased alpha brain wave activity. Alpha waves are generated during a relaxed, attentive mental state and thus this study indicated that theanine could promote relaxation without drowsiness.7

 

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) has been a popular food and medicine for thousands of years; in the 17th Century the English herbalist Nicolas Culpepper noted that lemon balm could improve mood and promote clear thinking, this use has been maintained to the present day.8 One of the primary ways lemon balm is thought to reduce feelings of stress and enhance mood is by improving brain levels of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which has anti-anxiety and calming effects, without being a sedative.9

 

  • Stress and anxiety – Theanine has been shown to increase brain alpha waves, which are characteristic of a relaxed but attentive mental state.10 In a study of 50 healthy female volunteers (aged from 18 to 22 years), it was shown that a single dose of 200 mg of theanine resulted in increased alpha brain wave activity within 40 minutes.11 This effect was again confirmed in a second study.12

 

A single dose of 200 mg theanine was shown in a study of healthy male and female volunteer’s to have some relaxing effects under normal resting conditions. Interestingly, the effects were superior to both placebo and certain anti-anxiety medication.13

 

To see if theanine could improve mental and physical performance under stress, university students were administered 200 mg of L-theanine prior to a stressful task (a mental arithmetic task for 20 min). Theanine intake resulted in reductions in perceived stress and a reduction in measures of stress (heart rate and salivary immunoglobulin A) (see image 4).

This finding suggests that L-theanine reduces the heightened sympathetic nervous system activity under acute stress.14

 A recent study involved a group of 5th year university students who were preparing for a pharmacy practice placement.15 The students took L-theanine (200 mg twice daily) or placebo for 1week before the practice started and then for 10 days over the practice period. They also had their morning salivary α-amylase activity (sAA) measured as a marker of sympathetic nervous system activity. The sympathetic nervous system governs the "fight-or-flight" response to stress with higher activity  related to symptoms such as worry and anxiety. Compared to the placebo-group, sAA was lower in the theanine group and subjective stress was also significantly lower.

 Lemon balm has also been studied for its stress reliving and mood enhancing effects.16 An early investigation found that a single 600mg dose of lemon balm extract could reduce negative mood effects of a stressful task and significantly improve feelings of calmness and alertness.17 Another study also found that a single dose of lemon balm could improve mood and cognitive performance.18

 

In a recent study lemon balm extract was given at a dose of 300 mg twice daily to a group of stressed people with mild-to-moderate anxiety and sleep disturbances. This study found that lemon balm reduced anxiety by 18%, reduced anxiety-associated symptoms by 15% and lowered insomnia by 42%. Most people responded to the treatment (95%), of which 70% achieved full remission for anxiety and 85% achieved full remission for insomnia.19

 

  • Memory and Cognition - The effect of l-theanine on alpha brain wave activity indicates enhanced attention and mental focus. It was shown that a single dose of 250 mg of l- theanine significantly increased alpha-wave activity in relation to a focused task, suggesting that L-theanine may have specific positive effects on focused attention.20

 

Lemon balm may also improve memory and concentration and has been studied in people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. After four months of treatment lemon balm was found to produce a significantly better outcome on cognitive function than placebo, and also helped to reduce feelings of agitation.21

  • Insomnia - In people suffering from stress related sleep problems, lemon balm has been shown to improve sleep when taken at a dose of 300 mg twice daily for approximately two weeks. 22 In children (aged 8-12 years) with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), who commonly have difficulty sleeping, 200 mg of l-theanine twice daily was effective in improving some aspects of sleep quality.23

 

  • Mental health - The effects of l-theanine were studied in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Sixty patients participated in an 8-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study during which 400 mg per day of l-theanine was added to ongoing antipsychotic treatment. Compared with placebo L-theanine reduced anxiety symptoms and stabilized mood, furthermore it was found to be safe, free of side effects, and well tolerated.24

 

In a complementary study the neurochemical effects of l-theanine were investigated. In the same patients l-theanine’s clinical improvement corresponded with changes in circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) to cortisol ratio suggesting a mechanism for theanine’s therapeutic effect.25

 

Dosage

One capsule twice daily, or as recommended by a health care professional. For children 7-12 years, one to two capsules daily.

For children 2-6 years, one capsule daily.

Not recommended under 2-years unless advised by a health care professional.

 

For stressful or mentally demanding tasks, take one to two capsules at least 40 minutes before the event.

 

Contraindications 

No safety issues with l-theanine have ever been reported. Theanine is well tolerated with no evidence of adverse effects.26 Similarly lemon balm has a high level of safety and human clinical studies have shown it is well tolerated with no side effects.

 

Safety has not been established in pregnancy or breastfeeding, therefore l-theanine and lemon balm should be avoided.

Interactions

Thyroid: A lemon balm extract was show to reduce conversion of thyroid hormones in an experimental study using isolated rat liver, however no adverse effects in humans have been observed, and thus should be considered safe.27

Sedatives: In an experimental study Lemon balm had an additive effect when used with a barbiturate medication, so should be used with caution by people taking sedatives.28

Anti-depressants: There is no known interaction of theanine and lemon balm with anti-anxiety or antidepressant medications, and thus is considered safe.

 

References

1 Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Roach PD. L-theanine: properties, synthesis and isolation from tea. J Sci Food Agric. 2011 Aug 30;91(11):1931-9.

2 Kimura K, Ozeki M, Juneja LR, Ohira H. L-Theanine reduces psychological and physiological stress responses. Biol Psychol. 2007 Jan;74(1):39-45

3 Yin C, Gou L, Liu Y, Yin X, Zhang L, Jia G, Zhuang X. Antidepressant-like Effects of L-theanine in the Forced Swim and Tail Suspension Tests in Mice. Phytother Res. 2011 Mar 21. doi: 10.1002/ptr.3456.

4 Unno K, Fujitani K, Takamori N, Takabayashi F, Maeda K, Miyazaki H, Tanida N, Iguchi K, Shimoi K, Hoshino M. Theanine intake improves the shortened lifespan, cognitive dysfunction and behavioural depression that are induced by chronic psychosocial stress in mice. Free Radic Res. 2011 Aug;45(8):966-74.

5 Yokogoshi H, Terashima T. Effect of theanine, d-glutamylethylamide, on brain monoamines, striatal dopamine release and some kinds of behaviour in rats. Nutrition 2000;16:776–777.

6 Terashima T, Takido J and Yokogoshi H, Time-dependent changes of amino acids in the serum, liver, brain and urine of rats administered with theanine. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 63:615–618 (1999).

7 Kobayashi K, Nagato Y, Aoi N, Juneja LR, Kim M, Yamamoto T, et al, Effects of L-theanine on the release of α-brain waves in human volunteers. Nippon Nogei Kagakukaishi 72:153–157 (1998).

8 Braun L, Cohen M. Herbs and Natural Supplements, 3rd Edition. 2012. Churchill LivingstoneAustralia.

9 Ibarra A, Feuillere N, Roller M, Lesburgere E, Beracochea D. Effects of chronic administration of Melissa officinalis L. extract on anxiety-like reactivity and on circadian and exploratory activities in mice. Phytomedicine. 2010 May;17(6):397-403.

10 Kobayashi K, Nagato Y, Aoi N, Juneja LR, Kim M, Yamamoto T, et al, Effects of L-theanine on the release of α-brain waves in human volunteers. Nippon Nogei Kagakukaishi 72:153–157 (1998).

11 Juneja LR, ChuDC, Okubo T,Nagato Y and Yokogoshi H, L-Theanine – a unique amino acid of green tea and its relaxation effect in humans. Trends Food Sci Technol 10:199–204 (1999).

12 Nobre AC, Rao A, Owen GN. L-theanine, a natural constituent in tea, and its effect on mental state.AsiaPac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17 Suppl 1:167-8.

13 Lu K, Gray MA, Oliver C, Liley DT, Harrison BJ, Bartholomeusz CF, Phan KL, Nathan PJ. The acute effects of L-theanine in comparison with alprazolam on anticipatory anxiety in humans. Hum Psychopharmacol. 2004 Oct;19(7):457-65.

14 Kimura K, Ozeki M, Juneja LR, Ohira H. L-Theanine reduces psychological and physiological stress responses. Biol Psychol. 2007 Jan;74(1):39-45.

15 Unno K, Tanida N, Ishii N, et al. Anti-stress effect of theanine on students during  pharmacy practice: Positive correlation among salivary α-amylase activity, trait  anxiety and subjective stress. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2013 Sep 16;111C:128-135.

16 Kennedy DO,ScholeyAB,TildesleyNT, Perry EK, Wesnes KA. Modulation of mood and cognitive performance following acute administration of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm). Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2002 Jul;72(4):953-64.

17 Kennedy DO, Little W, Scholey AB. Attenuation of laboratory-induced stress in humans after acute administration of Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm). Psychosom Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;66(4):607-13.

18 Kennedy DO, Wake G, Savelev S, et al. Modulation of mood and cognitive performance following acute administration of single doses of Melissa officinalis (Lemon balm) with human CNS nicotinic and muscarinic receptor-binding properties. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2003 Oct;28(10):1871-81.

19 Cases J, Ibarra A, Feuillère N, Roller M, Sukkar SG. Pilot trial of Melissa officinalis L. leaf extract in the treatment of volunteers suffering from mild-to-moderate anxiety disorders and sleep disturbances. Med J Nutrition Metab. 2011 Dec;4(3):211-218.

20 Gomez-Ramirez M, Higgins BA, Rycroft JA, Owen GN, Mahoney J, Shpaner M, Foxe JJ. The deployment of intersensory selective attention: a high–density electrical mapping study of the effects of theanine. Clin Neuropharmacol 2007;30:25– 38.

21 Akhondzadeh S, Noroozian M, Mohammadi M, Ohadinia S, Jamshidi AH, Khani M. Melissa officinalis extract in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2003 Jul;74(7):863-6.

22 Cases J, Ibarra A, Feuillère N, Roller M, Sukkar SG. Pilot trial of Melissa officinalis L. leaf extract in the treatment of volunteers suffering from mild-to-moderate anxiety disorders and sleep disturbances. Med J Nutrition Metab. 2011 Dec;4(3):211-218.

23 LyonMR, Kapoor MP, Juneja LR. The effects of L-theanine (Suntheanine®) on objective sleep quality in boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Altern Med Rev. 2011 Dec;16(4):348-54.

24 Ritsner MS, Miodownik C, Ratner Y, et al.L-theanine relieves positive, activation, and anxiety symptoms in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder: an 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-center study. J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;72(1):34-42

25 Miodownik C, Maayan R, Ratner Y, et al. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cortisol to sulfate of dehydroepiandrosterone molar ratio associated with clinical response to l-theanine as augmentation of antipsychotic therapy in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder patients. Clin Neuropharmacol. 2011 Jul-Aug;34(4):155-60.

26 Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Roach PD. L-theanine: properties, synthesis and isolation from tea. J Sci Food Agric. 2011 Aug 30;91(11):1931-9.

27 Auf'mkolk M, Köhrle J, Gumbinger H, Winterhoff H, Hesch RD. Antihormonal effects of plant extracts: iodothyronine deiodinase of rat liver is inhibited by extracts and secondary metabolites of plants. Horm Metab Res. 1984 Apr;16(4):188-92. 28 Soulimani R et al. Neurotropic action of the hydroalcoholic extract of Melissa officinalis in the mouse. Planta Med 57.2 (1991): 105–9.